ClaynatomyAnatomy with Clay

Hearing we  forget, seeing we remember, doing we understand

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This hands-on learning approach helps you to grasp and retain concepts with ease as it creates a learning process that is engaging, effective and fun.

Clayntomist™ practice what they are learning in a hands-on environment that allows them to embody the information as opposed to just sitting and listening.

Hands on ~ Minds on.  Hands on learning, not just for kids!

Your body awareness will be enhanced through both the building portion of Anatomy with Clay as well as the movement portion. 

My hope in sharing Claynatomy™ Anatomy with clay is to give you the tools of knowledge and skill to help you find and share healthier movement patterns so that you can interpret your clients as well as your own body needs, thru awareness, and understanding.

upcoming workshops

To attend or host this workshop or to find out about the homestudy version email info @ claynatomy.com

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NCBTMB
approved provider
450582-08

Anatomy with clayAnatomy means to cut, and is depicted in books and photos in what can at best be described as an artist’s interpretation. Keep this in mind, as your interpretation through Clay will be different then mine and merely a silhouette of the muscles. I want you to set your intention not on creating or building with exactness but to observe the relationships between the muscles and the bones, the shapes, the sizes, as well as the orientation with in the body. ClaynatomyAnatomy with Clay is a tool to help you better understand the inner workings of the body.
I share with you after much research and study, what I believe to be key elements in maintaining back health. Give yourself the freedom to come back and recreate these muscles as repetition is the finest learning tool I know of. In the workshop you will be given time to feel the muscles with in your body, visualize them at work as well as at play. Feel them when they are at Ease and honor and protect them when they are in DisEase.
Your body awareness will be enhanced through both the building portion of Anatomy with Clay as well as the movement portion. 

My hope in sharing Claynatomy™ Anatomy with clay is to give you the tools of knowledge and skill to help find healthier movement patterns both on and off the mat so that you can interpret your own body’s needs, thru awareness, and understanding.

Recommended Books

Clayantomy: Anatomy with Clay  Key Elements to Understanding the Structure and Function of the Back is the manual you will receive and can be done as a homestudy to receive CE’s thru NCBTMB

51gbr+285tL._SL125_This book will be a great reference and compliment to the manual.   The manual will have photos and list attachment sites, but for those tricky points and for those with little anatomy this book I highly recommend.

 

 

A 1999 study showed on PET scans that hands-on learning stimulates two different memory systems in the brain that become linked together. These systems recall factual memory and even memory of the hands-on process. By activating both, students have a greater likelihood of remembering what they studied with less need for role learning. (Mindful Learning: 101 Proven Strategies for Student and Teacher Success. 2009. Study by Andreason et al., 1999).

Another rationale for active learning is simply the nature of contemporary society. Today’s students are immersed in a fast-paced, multimedia-drenched world. They can access large amounts of information from many sources, decreasing a reliance on teacher-directed classrooms. Multisensory, interactive, self-directed approaches are essential for student and teacher success. (Mindful Learning: 101 Proven Strategies for Student and Teacher Success. 2009.)

Students who practice what they’re learning in a hands-on environment can often retain three and a half times as much as opposed to just sitting in a lecture room and listening intently. (Everest Career Education Network. 2010. http://news.everest.edu/post/2010/01/top-5-benefits-of-a-hands-on-learning-environment.)

Students in a hands-on science program will remember the material better, feel a sense of accomplishment when the task is completed, and be able to transfer that experience easier to other learning situations. (Perspectives on Hands-On Teaching. Haury and Rillero. 1994.)

“In every area we tested, the students who were involved in a hands-on project learned more and demonstrated a deeper understanding of the issues than the traditional group. This is a significant finding because it proves that with some students – especially groups traditionally underrepresented in science and engineering- the book-and-lecture format may not be the best way to engage student learning.” (Purdue University. 2009. http://news.uns.purdue.edu/x/2009a/090128DarkStudy.html)

The studies conducted to date indicate that laboratory experiences and other forms of instruction show a greater effectiveness compared with more traditional forms of science instruction for the following goals: improving mastery of subject matter, developing scientific reasoning, and cultivating interest in science. (America’s Lab Report: Investigations in High School Science. 2005. http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11311&page=1).

When you combine activities that require movement, talking, and listening, it activates multiple areas of the brain. “The more parts of your brain you use, the more likely you are to retain information,” says Judy Dodge, author of 25 Quick Formative Assessments for a Differentiated Classroom (Scholastic, 2009). “If you’re only listening, you’re only activating one part of the brain,” she says, “but if you’re drawing and explaining to a peer, then you’re making connections in the brain.”